TRI Foundation Appeal

 
$3,050 raised
31%
GOAL $10,000
14 donations
 
since Jan 2018
 
 
 

The Translational Research Institute (TRI) is a leading Australian innovative medical research, development and translation facility.  It is home to a range of cutting edge technology developments including interventions to prevent and treat human diseases, and provide diagnosis of early treatable disease.  Professor Carolyn Mountford is the TRI CEO and Director of Research.

Situated on Brisbane’s Princess Alexandra Hospital campus, TRI combines the research intellect and capability of the Queensland Government, The University of Queensland, Mater Research and the Queensland University of Technology.

TRI houses over 800 leading researchers and has members who are clinicians at the PA and Mater hospitals. It has two clinical trial facilities, one based at the PA Hospital and the other at the Centre for Children’s Health Research next to the Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital.  In an adjacent building, leased by TRI, is the biopharmaceutical manufacturer, Patheon Biologics.  This makes TRI one of a few places in the world where new biopharmaceuticals and treatments can be discovered, produced, clinically tested and manufactured at one location.

The TRI Foundation supports the important work of taking medical discovers through the TRI translational pathway from T1 to T5, getting new discoveries tested, approved, and to the patients.  The Chair of the TRI Foundation, Professor Ian Frazer, is the co-creator of the cervical cancer vaccine, Gardasil, which has reached T5 status. This milestone is achieved once an independent evaluation has established a proven health benefit on a world-wide basis.

The prevalence of cervical cancer-causing infections has dropped by almost 90 per cent in young women since Gardasil was first administered as a national immunisation program a decade ago.

The largest international evaluation of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine found even Australian women who were not vaccinated benefited because the pool of infection was reduced.

The study found in the 10 years since Gardasil became available, HPV infections decreased among Australian women aged 18-24 years by 76 per cent after one dose, and by 86 per cent after three doses. HPV is the most frequently sexually transmitted virus worldwide with two types causing about 70 per cent of cervical cancers and precancerous cervical lesions.

There is still much to do in developing countries as just 6 per cent of girls globally are vaccinated before their 15th birthday and more than 600,000 cancer cases are attributed to HPV each year.

Help us to continue to support world class scientist to develop their research from the bench to the bedside. The world needs more breakthroughs like the Gardasil HPV Cervical Cancer Vaccine, and we need you. Donate today, every donation will help our goal of increasing world health standards.

Thank you for your support of medical research.

$3,050 raised
31%
GOAL $10,000
14 donations
 
since Jan 2018
 
Fundraising for
TRI Foundation Limited
TRI Foundation funds medical research at the Translational Research Institute (TRI), housing over 1,000 researchers and clinicians working to develop new diagnostics and treatments to improve health. Prof Ian Frazer, co-inventor of the cervical cancer vaccine,Chair of the Foundation, founded TRI.

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